More Reviews-I am a Machine

Bridge to Terabithia-  I watched this to basically check it out and see if it was appropriate for my kids.  I don't think it is.  There is no questionable content, but the movie is just too grown up.  I haven't read the book but knew the basic plot.  The previews made me think it was going to be way off and maybe a kid friendly movie. The previews are wrong.  I think a 10 or 11 year old would probably be the youngest I would expose this movie to.  The concepts are just too big.  Ashli, however, has stated that she saw this at a friends house and that she didn't like it.

 

 

 

Pan's Labyrinth-  This movie was so close to being a kid's movie.  Well, except for the whole World War II military movie that was included in the film.  The movie was beautiful both visually and conceptually.  The parts were well acted (what do I know, they were speaking spanish), and well cast.  The Captain has by far the scarriest scene in the movie (the wine bottle).  The story itself was spooky yet beautiful.  It is hard to explain.  You, like Ophelia, don't know whether you should trust the faun or not.  This movie is so close to being great for kids of younger ages and would be fine if about 4-5 scenes were edited out.  I was really impressed with this movie.

 

 

 

Batman: City of Crime– This book exemplifies what I like about Batman.  The story shows how human and vulnerable he is while at the same time showing how his intellect and discipline make up for his vulnerabilities.  You spend most of the book just wondering what is going on and at the end you are kind of let down by the climax.  I am not sure if I just didn't understand a few things or if I somehow skipped a page that explained it all.  But, I have reached a point in life where not knowing is sometimes okay, and this is one of those times.  This was a really fun read.

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7 Responses to “More Reviews-I am a Machine”

  1. i cried like a damned baby during bridge to terabithia. the previews totally threw me off… and i didn't even read the book so i had no idea that it was going to be so sad. heh.pan's was great.

  2. I knew it was coming and it was still very sad. I kept thinking, "it is your fault, you should have invited her," which is exactly what the character was supposed to be thinking.

  3. I was about 9 or 10 when I read Bridge to Terabithia. I can't watch the movie because I'm STILL sad over 25 years later.
    But it was a gorgeous novel and I can't see how they could screw up one of the best friend stories of all time.

  4. Seriously? You were impressed with Pan's Labryinth? GAWD…. It made me want to saw off my toes and shoot off my fingertips. I don't know why everyone liked it! Slow! Lame story line! Really shitty graphics… Aargh. Worst of all? Subtitled.I'm so dissapointed you liked it. 😦

  5. I would agree that the CGI wasn't top notch but the sets were. I don't mind the subtitles. Too much anime in my youth, I guess. The story was slow, but rich and with characterization. The Others was a slow movie that sucked. The pacing worked for Pan's. Was it the greatest movie ever? No. Was it the greatest movie ever to have the word Labyrinth in it? No. But, it was a decent movie that I enjoyed.

  6. Okay. That's more like it. Because seriously, it was nowhere near being as cool as cool as just plain "Labyrinth" -because everyone loves muppets and David Bowe. 🙂

  7. My wife and her sister didn't know the story behind Terabithia. I came home about halfway through the screening of it for the 4 kids and asked them if they knew what was going to happen. Blissfully unaware – luckily the kids got less upset over the plotline than my wife and sister. I told them they really needed to find out about the plot of movies before just showing them to their kids :PI really enjoyed Pan's Labyrinth. Maybe it's just the fact that I had waited until after all they hype was past, but I thought it was beautifully shot and the acting was excellent. Like Budd, I don't mind subtitles and there was just enough fantastical elements to keep hope alive in such a shockingly horrible period of history.

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